Blog posts about England

Borough Market

The marketplace beneath the big railway viaduct near The Shard is Borough Market: one of London’s oldest. According to its own self-promotion, the market dates back to the twelfth century, when it was located at the southern end of the original London Bridge. Traders travel from far and wide to visit the market; a close friend of the…

Borough Market

St. Mary-le-Bow

The church of St. Mary-le-Bow in London sits halfway between St. Paul’s Cathedral and the Bank of England, on the historic road known as Cheapside. The church is widely accepted by many Londoners as being the true centre of London: tradition indicates that in order to be a true “Cockney” (Londoner), one must have been born within the sound…

St. Mary-le-Bow

Bonnington Square Garden, Vauxhall

The plot of land which has become Bonnington Square Gardens was cleared by a bomb during the Second World War and stood empty until the 1970s, when the local council made a weak attempt at turning it into a playground, before abandoning it to wild grass and stinging nettles. The council were reminded of its existence in the 1990s and…

Bonnington Square Garden, Vauxhall

Whitechapel Road

There’s plenty of history within a short distance of this part of Whitechapel; the next on my short list is at the junction of Fulbourne Road, in the midst of the Whitechapel Market. The upstairs rooms of a building adjacent to the thriving street market on this junction – now a clothing store with a snooker club upstairs – was…

Whitechapel Road

White Hart Dock, London

Walk along the north side of the river Thames at Lambeth and only the comparatively new wooden boat sculptures will even make you notice White Hart Dock. It’s an enclosed pool of tidal water, fed from the river, which dates back to the 14th century. Now filled with little else than rubbish, it was once the river access point…

White Hart Dock, London

Black Prince Road

I have spent a lot of time walking around London over the past week, with the intention of finding new sights and things of interest instead of just repeating the same old sights I’ve seen and visited a million times before. One of them was unexpected, as I walked from Stockwell back to the West End: Black Prince Road…

Black Prince Road

A wall amongst concrete

London is so big, that it’s difficult to know what to see when visiting for just a short time. I visited in order to take some documentary “street photographs” in summer 2012 and amongst the places I visited was the Barbican Estate: a largely brick and concrete, Brutalist estate in the City of London. I was repeatedly drawn there for…

A wall amongst concrete

The Severn Crossings

The first crossing for the M4 motorway across the River Severn was opened in 1966. This bridge features heavily in my memories of travelling to Pembrokeshire as a child, as well as later visits to friends at university in Cardiff. Back then, I didn’t know the extent of the history of river crossings here. Until the bridge…

The Severn Crossings

Seven Sisters

One of the most iconic pieces of landscape in the world is the stretch of white chalk cliffs along the south coast of England. Visible from many miles away when arriving by sea, the cliffs are one of the most famous symbols of England and its independence. The white cliffs are most often referred to as The White…

Seven Sisters

Memories of Thirlmere

An old haunt, which I first visited in very similar conditions in the mid 1990s. This weather and this landscape were where I first began trying to take “proper” landscape photos using a Mamiya C330 on loan from a friend and mentor. I used to drive around the English Lake District fairly aimlessly, looking for views and sitting…

Memories of Thirlmere

A pint with a view

I’m sometimes asked for tips on places to see and to visit in London. Among other things, visitors want to know where to eat and my usual tip – especially in the summer – is the Tattershall Castle. Although it may sound like the name of a pub, it’s actually a paddle steamer, built in 1934 and originally serving…

A pint with a view

London bridge trivia

In the British Parliament building, the Palace of Westminster, there are two parliamentary houses. The House of Commons is in the northern part of the building, in which ministers sit on green leather benches. In the southern part of the building is the House of Lords; here, incumbents sit on red leather benches. Spanning the river Thames, which flows past…

London bridge trivia

Flamborough Head

Just up the coast from the collapsing cliffs in East Yorkshire is the more solid mass of Flamborough Head, one of the northernmost sections of chalk which thread their way up from the south coast of England to the north. As the tide was out when I visited, I headed for the beach…

Flamborough Head

Major Oak, Sherwood Forest

As I was running ahead of time when returning to the airport after my recent trip to Yorkshire, I decided to take a break in my journey at an interesting spot en route. Seeing the signs from the motorway to Sherwood Forest, I decided to divert to the visitor centre, take a stroll through the woods and and…

Major Oak, Sherwood Forest

The coastal erosion of East Riding

The sandy coastline at East Riding in Yorkshire, on the east coast of northern England, has the unfortunate designation of being the most heavily eroding piece of coastline in Europe. That meant that when I found Neil White’s photos shortly before an upcoming visit to Yorkshire, I knew that I had to plan in a trip to see it. And what…

The coastal erosion of East Riding

The Shard

The Shard opened today in London and I’m looking forward to seeing Konstantin‘s photos, when he goes up to the viewing gallery – 245 metres above street level – this weekend. Firstly because I greatly enjoy seeing aerial photos of the city, but also because I received (as yet unbooked) tickets to go up the tower myself as a…

The Shard