History

The Rottenrow

Glasgow Royal Maternity Hospital, or to many Glaswegians “The Rottenrow”, was founded in 1834 and demolished in 2001. The Victorian building had fallen into disrepair by the time of its demolition and was deemed inadequate for modern requirements. A replacement for The Rottenrow was built at Glasgow Royal Infirmary and…

20th September 2017 | Read more »

We called for your intercession with God

A mural in the Lower Chapel at Flüeli-Ranft in Switzerland, initiated by Robert Durrer in 1920.

27th August 2017 | Read more »

Kilmuir Easter Church, Scotland

Kilmuir Easter Church

The only remains of antiquity that stood in this parish, were last year removed.  In the place of Delny, once a principal seat of the Earls of Ross, stood the ruins of a Romish chapel on a pleasant bank surrounded by graves.  This spot has been deserted as a burying…

18th April 2017 | Read more »

Gretna Green, Scotland

A place of irregular marriages

The small town of Gretna Green, which lies alongside the M6/A74M on the border between Scotland and England, is one of the most popular wedding destinations in the world.

7th February 2017 | Read more »

Happy birthday, Permanent Tourist!

I wrote and posted my first blog post in this version of my website ten years ago today. To celebrate, I'm reviving the “Photos” section of the site, which will contain my best and my favourite photos.

20th August 2016 | Read more »

Frauenbad am Stadthausquai

Bathing in public was forbidden to the women of Zurich until 1837. Once the ban had been lifted, the city constructed a bathing house on the river Limmat, alongside the Stadthausquai next to the city hall.

11th August 2016 | Read more »

Processing time: 70 years

Processing time: 70 years

The Rescued Film Project discovers and processes 31 rolls of film shot by an American WWII soldier over 70 years ago.

19th February 2016 | Read more »

Patience

After a long time with a much reduced amount of interest for photography, I am finally getting back to wanting to capture images again. The unenforced time out has done me good. I am reminded once more of the pleasure of waiting for the moment to be right; when the light…

15th October 2015 | Read more »

Toni-Areal, Zurich

I am rarely in Zurich and I prefer the countryside and mountains to cities these days. But I like to be in the midst of industrial architecture sometimes, and one of my favourite sites is the former milk processing plant in the industrial area of Pfingstweid. Mainly because of the huge…

20th September 2015 | Read more »

Piscina Mirabilis

Arriving in the town of Bacoli, on the headland a few miles west of the centre of Naples, you feel a long way from the tourist crowds and certainly not anywhere historic or especially noteworthy. But look into the history of the area and you’ll find that the bay here, now surrounded by slightly…

23rd November 2014 | Read more »

Battle of Britain Memorial Flight

Battle of Britain Memorial Flight

I'm not especially knowledgeable about aircraft but there's something about plane flypasts which give me goosebumps.

21st September 2014 | Read more »

Visual memories

An Australian family set up a website to help their grandfather remember the places to which he travelled, and to ask the internet to help them identify some of the more obscure places on his travels.

4th September 2014 | Read more »

Farnborough Air Show

Farnborough Air Show

The Red Arrows perform at the 2014 Farnborough Air Show.

21st July 2014 | Read more »

Cimiterio delle Clarisse, Ischia

The gruesome crypt beneath the former monastery in the Aragonese Castle of Ischia Ponte.

25th June 2014 | Read more »

Capo Miseno

“At the top of the great stone lighthouse, hidden beyond the ridge of the southern headland, the slaves were dousing the fires to greet the dawn. It was supposed to be a sacred place. According to Virgil, this was the spot where Misenus, the herald of the Trojans, slain by…

10th June 2014 | Read more »

The Monument, London

Although there are plenty of monuments (with a small “m”) around London, there is only one Monument (with a large “M”): that to the Great Fire of London. The Great Fire of London, which raged through 400 acres of the city within the original Roman walls in…

25th April 2014 | Read more »

Jemima’s Journey Through Switzerland

Jemima’s Journey Through Switzerland

British Pathé was a leading news service in the earlier part of the twentieth century, when people would visit a picture house (or cinema) to see the latest news reels, instead of seeing them in the comfort of their own homes. British Pathé completed their YouTube channel this week…

18th April 2014 | Read more »

Borough Market

The marketplace beneath the big railway viaduct near The Shard is Borough Market: one of London’s oldest. According to its own self-promotion, the market dates back to the twelfth century, when it was located at the southern end of the original London Bridge. Traders travel from far and…

16th April 2014 | Read more »

St. Mary-le-Bow

The church of St. Mary-le-Bow in London sits halfway between St. Paul’s Cathedral and the Bank of England, on the historic road known as Cheapside. The church is widely accepted by many Londoners as being the true centre of London: tradition indicates that in order to be a true “…

15th April 2014 | Read more »

Blackfriars Road station

What remains of the original Blackfriars station on the Charing Cross railway in London – this signage – was restored in 2005, and is clearly visible within a short distance of the current Tube station at Southwark. The site of the station, now referred to as Blackfriars Road in…

12th April 2014 | Read more »

White Hart Dock, London

Walk along the north side of the river Thames at Lambeth and only the comparatively new wooden boat sculptures will even make you notice White Hart Dock. It’s an enclosed pool of tidal water, fed from the river, which dates back to the 14th century. Now filled with little…

11th April 2014 | Read more »

Black Prince Road

I have spent a lot of time walking around London over the past week, with the intention of finding new sights and things of interest instead of just repeating the same old sights I’ve seen and visited a million times before. One of them was unexpected, as I walked from…

10th April 2014 | Read more »

A wall amongst concrete

London is so big, that it’s difficult to know what to see when visiting for just a short time. I visited in order to take some documentary “street photographs” in summer 2012 and amongst the places I visited was the Barbican Estate: a largely brick and concrete, Brutalist estate…

13th March 2014 | Read more »

The Severn Crossings

The first crossing for the M4 motorway across the River Severn was opened in 1966. This bridge features heavily in my memories of travelling to Pembrokeshire as a child, as well as later visits to friends at university in Cardiff. Back then, I didn’t know the extent of…

30th November 2013 | Read more »