Using a drone subtly

I wrote a couple of years ago about the eternal search for the perfect angle. Going out into the world with a camera to try and find those spots from which the essence of a piece of countryside, or town, or coastline are perfectly captured. I moaned about the way in which so many photographically perfect views are blocked by trees, or power lines, or private land containing large buildings.

One of my main reasons for buying a drone wasn’t to fly it high in the sky and take pictures from a bird’s eye angle. Or to have fun zooming it across the countryside. (Both of these reasons turn out to have their own merits, of course.) My primary reason for buying it was to get the opportunity to take those photos which are just out of reach by other means.

It’s not my intention to fill my photographic archives with high-altitude views, but to take – and share – images of scenes from the best possible angle. If that point of view is 100 metres above the ground, or a metre above the waters of a lake, is of no real consequence. There are views which I see often, which are obscured by an electricity pylon or behind a row of impenetrable trees. These are the ones which will give me the most pleasure, as many amongst them have been frustrating me for years.